By Anna Reachi

According to the most conservative estimates, trade turnover of Asia and Europe will grow annually by an average of 2-3 percent. Thus, 7 years later, in 2020, it is estimated at 240 million tonnes in the physical terms and 1.8 trillion U.S. dollars in monetary terms. Even today there is a struggle for such a tidbit between countries that are expanding their transit potential, and between different modes of transport


U.S. Secretary of State cites findings of report by Office of Director of National Intelligence about possible increased regional tension over water in Central Asia

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton urged countries around the world to make water a priority in their foreign policy and find cooperative solutions to shared water challenges. READ MORE

Uncertain World: China-Japan Tensions – Who Stands to Gain?


By Fyodor Lukyanov

The Asia-Pacific Region’s growing global economic and political importance was a clear priority for all those attending APEC 2012 in Vladivostok. Representatives from economies across the globe gathered to discuss its promising future. But recent events in the region have reaffirmed the axiom that great opportunities tend to be accompanied by equally great risks. READ MORE

Vladivostok Shifts Into High Gear to Attract Asian Investors


Leaders from 20 nations around the Pacific Basin are gathering for their annual meeting on economic cooperation, held this year in Russia, a nation not often seen as a Pacific power. READ MORE

Tajikistan – a New Energy Actor


By Aygul Hanova

Until recently, a solution for the future of economic sustainability in Tajikistan was thought to be dependent on Rogun hydropower plant. However, future of the power plant is still challenged by Uzbekistan’s claim that it will reduce water in this country. The World Bank has not yet confirmed its support in the construction of the power plant. The Tajik government is looking for other investors to proceed with construction of Rogun. The project is crucial for the country where due to an energy deficit, population receives only 2-3 hours of electricity daily. READ MORE

What is Going to Happen to Middle Asia?


By Piotr Woźniak

Each day gets us closer to the date of withdrawal of the main part of American troops and all NATO units from Afghanistan, planned on the end of 2014, and it becomes clear, that the prospects of Middle Asia look more indefinite. As it has already been known, a part of military equipment the USA plans to give the former soviet republics of the region. READ MORE

Uzbekistan: Will Karimov Get Blown Off in Windy City?


By Deirdre Tynan

It appears that Uzbek President Islam Karimov’s efforts to obtain a one-on-one meeting with US President Barack Obama are coming up short, an informed source indicates. Obama's preliminary schedule for the upcoming NATO summit reportedly does not include individual meetings with any of the Central Asian leaders who are planning on attending the event. READ MORE

'Europe needs a dynamic policy in Asia'

By Daniel Scheschkewitz

At the 48th Munich Security Conference, starting February 3, global leaders and generals will tackle Europe's relationship with Asia and the impact of the Arab Spring. DW spoke with Chairman Wolfgang Ischinger. READ MORE

Central Asia: Russia Grapples with a Security Dilemma


By Joshua Kucera

CSTO Countries NATO Countries Russia EurasiaNet's Weekly Digest Geopolitics War in Afghanistan READ MORE

Bulat Sultanov: "We Shouldn’t Be Afraid of Neighbors, but Respect Them"

An interview with the Director of Kazakhstani Institute for Strategic Studies, PhD in history science, professor Bulat Sultanov. Our interlocutor shares with his view on Chinese threat, the secret of stability in Kazakhstan and further prospects for development of the relations between the People’s Republic of China and Kazakhstan. READ MORE